Moer Series 9 From The Moff

Steven Moffat has dropped a few more tantalising hints about what’s in store for Series 9 whilst explaining the rationale for including more two-parters in Peter Capaldi’s second run as the Doctor.

“It’s about messing around with how much of the plot will be done in 45 minutes,” Moffat said, interviewed at this week’s BAFTA TV Awards Nominees party.

In the brief interview clip for Digital Spy he refers again to his concern that, ten years in to the revived series, there’s a risk of viewers becoming just a little too familiar with the format, the “danger of people getting used to the rhythm of the show”. From what he says, we shouldn’t necessarily expect longer stories to be straightforward two-parters, either…

Also in the interview he promises a “quite stunning” performance from Peter Capaldi and speaks (in broad terms) about what Clara and Missy will get up to next time around…

Steven Moffat has dropped a few more tantalising hints about what’s in store for Series 9 whilst explaining the rationale for including more two-parters in Peter Capaldi’s second run as the Doctor.

“It’s about messing around with how much of the plot will be done in 45 minutes,” Moffat said, interviewed at this week’s BAFTA TV Awards Nominees party.

In the brief interview clip for Digital Spy he refers again to his concern that, ten years in to the revived series, there’s a risk of viewers becoming just a little too familiar with the format, the “danger of people getting used to the rhythm of the show”. From what he says, we shouldn’t necessarily expect longer stories to be straightforward two-parters, either…

Also in the interview he promises a “quite stunning” performance from Peter Capaldi and speaks (in broad terms) about what Clara and Missy will get up to next time around…

22 Things

22 things you’ll only understand if you date a Doctor Who fan

(Radio Times)

22 things you'll only understand if you date a Doctor Who fan

All’s fair in love and a Time War and nobody knows that better than Doctor Who fans and their other halves.

You’re going to have to sit through a LOT of episodes

You're going to have to sit through a LOT of episodes

2
And chances are they’ll compare you to their Doctor or companion of choice

And chances are they'll compare you to their Doctor or companion of choice

3
Don’t even bother trying to compete, you won’t win

Don't even bother trying to compete, you won't win

4
The Doctor will become the third person in your relationship

The Doctor will become the third person in your relationship

5
Saturday nights will have to be spent on the sofa when it’s Doctor Who season

Saturday nights will have to be spent on the sofa when it's Doctor Who season

6
But the more time you spend watching the show, the more it’ll grow on you

But the more time you spend watching the show, the more it'll grow on you

7
You’ll find yourself comparing THEM to a Doctor or companion of YOUR choice

You'll find yourself comparing THEM to a Doctor or companion of YOUR choice

8
And discussing various aspects of your relationship using obscure references from the show

And discussing various aspects of your relationship using obscure references from the show

9
Until you can’t remember a space or time that didn’t involve Doctor Who

Until you can't remember a space or time that didn't involve Doctor Who

10
Or a Halloween that didn’t involve a Doctor Who cosplay combo

Or a Halloween that didn't involve a Doctor Who cosplay combo

11
You might even end up dreaming about a Tardis wedding

You might even end up dreaming about a Tardis wedding

12
Because there’s something special about Doctor Who fans

Because there's something special about Doctor Who fans

13
They’re loyal to a fault

They're loyal to a fault

14
Relentlessly charming

Relentlessly charming

15
And their words sweep you off your feet every single timey-wimey

And their words sweep you off your feet every single timey-wimey

16
You’re proud to say they’re your other half

You're proud to say they're your other half

17
Because they’ll take you on an adventure in space and time

Because they'll take you on an adventure in space and time

18
And you’ll never ever want it to end

And you'll never ever want it to end

19
Y’see it takes two to make a Who dream come true

Y'see it takes two to make a Who dream come true

20
And you can take on the universe

And you can take on the universe

21
Together

Together

22
Or not at all

Or not at all

 Back to the basement for me… :)

R2-Dalek 2

Ever wondered what would happen if R2-D2 turned to the Dark Side? Well, as it turns out, the little astromech droid would make a pretty convincing Dalek.

Star_Wars_meets_Doctor_Who_as_R2_D2_becomes_a_Dalek

Who knew?

Now we need C-3PO as a Cybermen!

(ask and the Internet shall deliver)

The popular Star Wars character was re-imagined as one of the Doctor’s deadliest foes by artist Earl Ellis as part of the #R2ME2 exhibition, which previewed at the Star Wars Celebration in Anaheim, California.

Bravisimo!

Pianist Sonya Belousova

First Regeneration, Second Doctor

From the Syracuse University Who Class- Professor Anthony Rotolo :

First Regeneration, Second Doctor

Approaching the mid and late 1960s, “Doctor Who” rose swiftly in popularity. Change was in the air and the term “Dalekmania” was coined about the same time as “Beatlemania.” Daleks even graced the cover of “Radio Times” in the U.K.

With the show’s popularity came a parade of new producers with plenty of new ideas. Rumors swirled among both staffers and viewers that William Hartnell was too old and sick to keep playing the Doctor.

“It became clear the show would not progress with [Hartnell],” Rotolo said. “On set, he didn’t have lots of friends.”

Remarkably, the writers and producers killed off Hartnell’s Doctor, but the show wasn’t canceled. In 1966, there were no day-after recaps. There was no live-tweet analysis. There was no context for the Doctor’s death.

“They didn’t know what that moment would become to the series,” Rotolo said. “All they really did was recast the part. They needed a sci-fi way to deal with it.”

01-Patrick-Troughton-510x382.png

The producers’ “sci-fi” solution was to hire a new actor.

Patrick Troughton took over the lead role, and played the Doctor completely differently from 1966 to 1969. He’s a younger, recorder-playing Doctor who accessorizes with plaid pants, a bow tie and sometimes a cape.

“It’s not just a new Doctor, it’s a new show,” Rotolo said.

Hartnell played the Doctor like a stern, old man. He’s a grandfather, whisking away his young granddaughter on adventures. The relationship reflects that of “The Wizard of Oz” and Dorothy, or Prospero and Miranda in “The Tempest.”

Nicknamed the “Cosmic Hobo,” Troughton’s Doctor is impish, playful and funny. He teases and outwits his enemies. Traveling with this Doctor is fun…and voluntary. Companions join because they want to.

For the first time, the Doctor’s companions during the regeneration (Ben and Polly) serve as the continuity between Doctors. They help explain why the Doctor looks and acts differently.

In the “Tomb of the Cybermen,” there’s a moment when Troughton’s Doctor asks his young companion, Victoria, if she’s happy. A much warmer, caring relationship develops between the Doctor and his companion, like a father and daughter or student and mentor.

Contrastingly, when companions Ian and Barbara say they want to go home, Hartnell’s Doctor calls them idiots.

Troughton was heralded as brilliant. He’s been called the father of the modern Doctor, since all portrayals ever since have been influenced by him.

The BBC drops the ball

Sadly, much of Troughton’s “brilliant” work doesn’t exist for us to watch.

Lots of early “Doctor Who” episodes are lost because the BBC didn’t keep them. In the 1960s and 1970s, they destroyed or taped over original film or videotape copies to save space or money. As one classmate tweeted, “The BBC forgot back up to the Cloud.”

“There was no such concept of reruns or streaming at that time,” Rotolo said.

This was regular practice for companies to destroy programs after airing them. How could the BBC have known this little sci-fi series would develop such a rabid fan base in the next five decades?

Luckily, many copies were recovered from outside sources, like overseas broadcasts. Some shows have even been pieced together using parts of footage, audio (recorded by fans) and transmission photos called tele-snaps, which served to boost portfolios for actors and producers.

Remember, this all happened before VCR recording.

With those pieces, the BBC commissioned animators to fill in the blanks. We watched one of those animated episodes in class, called The Tenth Planet. It’s the introduction of a frightening new villain which went on to become nearly as iconic as the Daleks.

3. Cybermen

The Cybermen, a race of cyborg villains, first appear in The Tenth Planet serial. They’re responsible for the First Doctor’s “death” and regeneration.

When the Cybermen first debut, they’re terrifying. Rotolo puts them on par with the Weeping Angels, a notoriously frightening “Who” monster introduced in 2007.

The Cybermen are humanoid, but alter themselves until they have few, if any, remaining organic parts. They retain human brains, but become horrifying shells of what they once were, devoid of all human emotion and values.

They capitalized on the threat of mixing man and machine at a time when prostheses or “spare-part” surgery was developing rapidly.

In class we watched the episode “Tomb of the Cybermen.” It was thought to be lost, then recovered in 1990s. Eleventh Doctor Matt Smith noted Troughton’s performance in this episode as a direct influence for his own interpretation of character.

News Bits

Some of the long-running show’s stars – and its most famous monsters – were gathered together in a picture inspired by the classic cover of The Beatles’ Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band.

The original, famously designed by pop-artist Sir Peter Blake, featured stars including Fred Astaire, Bob Dylan and footballer Albert Stubbins on the front, alongside the Fab Four.

Details on new Doctor Who books ft. The Twelfth Doctor and Clara

 Included below are the details on three new original Doctor Who novels featuring Peter Capaldi’s Twelfth Doctor and Jenna Coleman’s Clara. Currently, no cover art has been confirmed but all three releases hit the streets on Sept 10, 2015.
Royal Blood By Una McCormack
The Grail is a story, a myth! It didn’t exist on your world! It can’t exist here!
The city-state of Varuz is failing. Duke Aurelian is the last of his line, his capital is crumbling, and the armies of his enemy, Duke Conrad, are poised beyond the mountains to invade. Aurelian is preparing to gamble everything on one last battle. So when a holy man, The Doctor, comes to Varuz from beyond the mountains, Aurelian asks for his blessing in the war.
But all is not what it seems in Varuz. The city-guard have lasers for swords, and the halls are lit by electric candlelight. Aurelian’s beloved wife, Guena, and his most trusted knight , Bernhardt, seem to be plotting to overthrow their Duke, and Clara finds herself drawn into their intrigue…
Will The Doctor stop Aurelian from going to war? Will Clara’s involvement in the plot against the Duke he discovered? Why is Conrad’s ambassador so nervous? And who are the ancient and weary knights who arrive in Varuz claiming to he on a quest for the Holy Grail…?
An original novel featuring The Twelfth Doctor and Clara, as played by Peter Capaldi and Jenna Coleman.

Big Bang Generation by Gary Russell
I’m an archaeologist, but probably riot the one you were expecting.
Christmas 2015, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Imagine everyone’s surprise when a time portal opens up in Sydney Cove. Imagine their shock as a massive pyramid now sits beside the Harbour Bridge, inconveniently blocking Port Jackson and glowing with energy. Imagine their fear as Cyrrus ‘the mobster’ Globb, Professor Horace Jaanson and an alien assassin called Kik arrive to claim the glowing pyramid. Finally imagine everyone’s dismay when they are followed by a bunch of con artists out to spring their greatest grift vet.
This gang consists of Legs (the sexy comedian), Dog Boy (providing protection and firepower), Shortie (handling logistics), Da Trowel (in charge of excavation and history) and their leader, Doc (busy making sure the universe isn’t destroyed in an explosion that makes the Big Bang look like a damp squib).
And when someone accidentally reawakens the Ancients of Time – which, Doc reckons, wasn’t the wisest or best-judged of actions – things get a whole lot more complicated…
An original novel featuring The Twelfth Doctor, as played by Peter Capaldi.

Deep Time By Trevor Baxendale
I do hope you’re all ready to be terrified!
The Phaeron disappeared from the universe over a million years ago. They travelled among the stars using roads made from time and space, but left only relics behind. But what actually happened to the Phaeron? Some believe they were they eradicated by a superior force… Others claim they destroyed themselves.
Or were they in fact the victims of an even more hideous fate?
In the far future, humans discover the location of the last Phaeron road – and The Doctor and Clara join the mission to see where the road leads. Each member of the research team knows exactly what they’re looking for —but only The Doctor knows exactly what they’ll find.
Because only The Doctor knows the true secret of the Phaeron: a monstrous secret so terrible and powerful that it must be buried in the deepest grave imaginable…
An original novel featuring The Twelfth Doctor and Clara, as played by Peter Capaldi and Jenna Coleman.

Sour? Ninth Part 2

Christopher Eccleston has been talking more about why he did Doctor Who, and why he left the programme so soon…

Christopher Eccleston’s stint in the TARDIS lasted just 13 episodes back in 2005, when the actor quit the role, in turn making way for David Tennant. He’s talked in the past about not wanted to be seen in just one role, and that he has no plans to reprise the role of the Doctor.

Now, in two new interviews to promote the ITV show Safe House, he’s revealed more about why he quit Doctor Who so soon.

“I’d had enough”, he told the Daily Record. “I wanted to do it my way, they wanted something else. We were never going to compromise, so it was best to be straight about it and just go”.

“It’s very easy to stay in one job and make that your comfort zone”, he added, “and I want to resist that temptation”.

Then, in an upbeat conversation with Radio 4, Eccleston reaffirmed that he approached Russell T Davies about playing the Doctor in the first place. Was he pleased with what he achieved? “I think I over pitched the comedy”, he said. “If I had my time again I’d do the comedy very differently. I think where I did possibly succeed was in the tortured stuff: surprise, surprise!”.

He continued, arguing that “what’s interesting in this country is whenever a story like this is emerging, they concentrate on the negative. I don’t think it’s important that I left, I think it’s important that I did it in the first place”.

He was asked, however, why he departed. “I’m still there, I was in David Tennant, I was in Matt Smith – are we going to edit this? – I was in Peter Capaldi! Nobody knows this about the Time Lords!”

But ultimately, “myself and three other individuals at the top of the pyramid clashed”, he confirmed. Yet, as you can hear in the following clip, he wouldn’t say more than that, given that they weren’t in the interview to put their part of the story across.

Here’s the interview…

The Master

I found the following interesting because I am on panel at the upcoming Phoenix Comic Con ( http://www.phoenixcomicon.com/) dealing with The Master.

I have the Ainley Master and have written up a treatment for my part of the panel which I obviously can’t disclose ahead of time but it has some similarities to this article. Thus, like the Doctor, the Master shares some basic traits of his personality across his regenerations. Fascinating stuff.

Gustaff Behr begins a new series examining each incarnation of the Master, starting with Delgado.

This is the part where I’m supposed to do the whole ‘intro’ paragraph thing. The Master. Rival Time Lord. Arch enemy of the Doctor. But you know all that already. Instead, let’s get to the fun stuff. “Masterology” is the study of the Master, focusing in-depth on each of the various incarnations, chronology, aims and a psychological personality deconstruction of the multiple bodies, specifically concerning psychoanalytical, behavioral and social-cognitive perspectives. Sounds fun eh? Let’s start with when the Master was first introduced to us…

The Suit – Roger Delgado

Roger-Delgado-master

By this time, the Master was already a fully realized character, in the sense that he was much further along his regenerative cycle than the Doctor. In this ‘first’ incarnation, the Master’s persona was that of a scrupulously polite gentleman who had no qualms about slaughtering people, but who occasionally showed genuine reluctance in harming the Third Doctor.

That last part is important as it involves more than just a simple ‘Why Not Just Shoot Him’ trope. It reveals a deep psychological trait that is inherent in all Masters, but often to varying degrees. It’s also worth mentioning that a lot of this particular Master’s schemes involved him eventually spending a lot of time with the Doctor, which suggests a subconscious desire to be near him. The capacity of which was never made clear during this incarnation, but it is fairly likely that at this point, since both Time Lords considered their battles to be that of wits and both showed amusement at whatever obstacles the other placed in their way, this is likely due to the Master simply enjoying the Doctor’s company as an intellectual equal, which also points to a competitive personality that constantly strives to best him.

delgado-master-The-Sea-DevilsAnother defining trait was the sardonic sense of humor displayed by this Master, as well as his prejudice towards any life form not from Gallifrey. He displayed a genuine resentment towards people and other life forms, regarding them as primitives. This elitism could be an early symptom of Narcissistic-Personality Disorder, but this Master was not above admitting that the Doctor was his equal (or near so), something that someone with NPD would not admit so casually or earnestly.

Something that would come and go with the incarnations was a growing sense of spitefulness. The Delgado Master rarely exhibited a penchant to spite people, but on at least one occasion, his goal was simply to destroy the Doctor’s favorite species. Since spitefulness is closely related to resentment and the Delgado Master was rarely resentful – if anything, he was pleasantly annoyed, but also willing to accept defeat like a gentleman and wait until next time. The motivation to spite the Doctor could very well stem from something the Master views as a gross betrayal of their friendship. The events of Master spring to mind, but this is theoretical speculation as neither the Master nor the Doctor would remember these events until much later in their respective lives. The story, as told by Death is that during their youth, both Time Lords were austerely terrorized by a boy called Torvic. To escape a deathly predicament instigated on one of them, the other was forced to kill Torvic to save his friend’s life. It is possible the events of Master and the respective actions of both the young Doctor and Master during this adventure is what the Master subconsciously views as betrayal which is understandable due to the particular circumstances involved.

William-Hughes-master-youngIt is also worth noting that the Master is a victim of Nurture as opposed to Nature. Staring into the Untempered Schism, having Rassilon retroactively implant him with a signal that would drive him mad and being chosen as Death’s Champion, all these events paint the Time Lord as someone who was destined to be evil since the moment he was born. In that regard, he is a Tragic Villain.

The Master’s aims however, reveal him to be a much more typical villain also, especially in this incarnation. His aims and goals can be divided into three categories, namely ‘Universal Conquest’, ’Quest For New Life’, and ‘Killing the Doctor’.

The Delgado’s Master mostly ticked the ‘Universal Conquest’ box, desiring to become ‘Master of all Matter’. Despite being warned that the Master would surely try to kill him in Terror of the Autons, the Delgado Master rarely resorted to killing the Doctor, only doing so if he viewed him as an unmovable obstacle in his plans. Later incarnations would reject this pension entirely and some would even adopt this goal as personal hobby.

Frontier-In-Space-dalekUnfortunately though, one of the more negative aspects surrounding this Master is his status as a ‘static character’. Delgado’s Master received very little development beyond his scheme of the week and almost all of his character was devoted to him simply wanting to take over or escape from Earth.

According to Terrance Dicks, the original creator of the Master, Delgado’s incarnation was meant to be the thirteenth and final Master. However, in-universe dialogue, accompanied by further psychological and behavioral evidence of the character suggests otherwise.

For instance, the Doctor mentioned that the Master had used up his lives in The Deadly Assassin and that the corpse Master was the end result. However, the Delgado Master never once (on-screen) showed any pension for extending his life. His plans always fell into one or both of the other categories. This suggests a subconscious lack of interest, which is common in young people who don’t worry about getting older until they spot the first signs of aging. Though the Delgado Master was greying by his first appearance in Terror of the Autons, given that he never seemed to worry about the longevity of his life, it’s more likely that this was either the penultimate incarnation or an even earlier version of the Master. In layman’s terms: The Master never sought to extend his life because he didn’t see any point yet.

The idea is further rejected by the fact that if this was indeed a younger version of the Peter Pratt/Geoffrey Beevers Master, then logic and reason would dictate that the Master make use of his youthful body to seek new life instead of waiting for death to creep up on him. It is possible that his quest for new life occurred off-screen, but that leads directly into pure speculation that isn’t supported by any medium except the imagination of whoever is speculating.

Frontier-in-Space-masterAs touched upon earlier, this Master wasn’t terribly complex. This extended to his schemes as well. He was easy to figure out once you identified his routine and predictably used the same strategies over and over again, merely tweaking things a little to look slightly different. In other words, it was always the same present, just different wrapping paper.

Counting in this Master’s favor was the simplistic creativity his schemes often employed. They were uncomplicated and to the point, unlike later incarnations who would think up overly problematical schemes that had a gaping hole at the center of each which would later be used to defeat them. Also regarding the predictability aspect, this Master wasn’t terribly imaginative. This is evidenced by the various aliases he used such as “Colonel Masters” or “Mr. Magister”. These Clark Kent disguises often required the other characters in the story to be plot dense since that was the only way a reasonable person would be unable to figure out it was really the Master in disguise. After all, an alias is exponentially less effective if it contains the person’s real name.

Art-Life

The Art Of Doctor Who (Credit: DWM)

Doctor Who Magazine Special: The Art of Doctor Who

The characters and scenarios from Doctor Who have been inspiring artists since 1963. The latest special edition of Doctor Who Magazine celebrates the best of their contributions to both the programme and the vast range of licensed products that rely on their skill.

“This is how the story of Doctor Who unfolded in the eyes of the artists who interpreted, shaped and represented the show,” says editor Marcus Hearn. “In fact, the story begins before the first episode was even transmitted – we have articles examining the creation of the Doctor Who logo and the filming of the original title sequence.”

This 100-page Special is packed full of stunning reproductions of original artwork from the Dalek annuals, the Doctor Who annuals, Doctor Who Weekly, the DVD range, the Radio Times, Target Books, TV Century 21, the VHS releases and more.

Other highlights include:

  • Articles covering the history of graphic design and illustration in Doctor Who, from the early 1960s to the present day.
  • Award-winning graphic designer Bernard Lodge explains how he created the series’ first four title sequences.
  • Concept artists Peter McKinstry and Matt Savage share their portfolios from 21st-century Doctor Who.
  • Interviews with Target Books artists Chris Achilleos, Jeff Cummins, Bill Donohoe, Roy Knipe, Tony Manero, Andrew Skilleter and Nick Spender.
  • Interviews with comics artists including Mike Collins, Martin Geraghty, Dave Gibbons, Richard Piers Rayner, John Ridgway, Nick Roche, John Ross, Adrian Salmon, Lee Sullivan and Alice Zhang.
  • Interviews with VHS and DVD cover artists Lee Binding, Colin Howard and Alister Pearson.

Disney Doc

BBC’s world-renowned science fiction drama “Doctor Who” will premiere on Disney XD beginning SATURDAY, MAY 9 (9:00 p.m., ET/PT).

But it’s only Series 2-4 Featuring David Tennant’s Tenth Doctor.

I wonder if they’ll loop them like my old PBS station used to do when it was Tom Baker. Robot to Logopolis and back to Robot again, endlessly for 3 years until they were convinced to show other Doctors for awhile, then they went back to Tom Baker.

The May 9 broadcast will offer the first episode of the first season in which he was featured. It will pick up again on June 13, with eight episodes rolling out through June 20. Pay TV subscribers who have the Watch Disney XD app can begin to watch the shows on mobile and digital devices beginning June 14. 

Maybe not. But it’s a start.

But apparently they are giving “The Christmas Invasion” a pass though.

Networks always make ‘interesting’ choices. And how are they going to explain Captain Jack?! :)

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