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14 in 10

So, this confirms that – after the 2016 Christmas special – Doctor Who series 10 will consist of the standard-issue 13 episodes.

The Radio Times is reporting exclusively that Doctor Who series 10 will begin filming this May. Using some fag-packet maths then, a typical nine-month run should take it all the way to early 2017.

It’s currently understood that outgoing showrunner Steven Moffat will remain in place for a further fourteen episodes, including twelve episodes of season ten and the 2016 and 2017 Christmas Specials, before new head honcho Chris Chibnall steps in in 2018.

Additionally, “senior show sources” are reportedly yet to select who will be travelling with Peter Capaldi in the TARDIS as the Doctor’s Companion. “It is understood auditions for Jenna Coleman’s replacement have still not begun”, says the RT.

Doctor Who Magazine has asked Steven Moffat if he’ll present a plethora of two-parters again this time around, as served him pretty well in season 9. “Something else will happen [in series 10],” he said in response.

The Moff explained that “each year, we try to do something different – almost out of perversity, to make things more difficult for ourselves – so that we’re not getting into a groove, we’re not becomingly boringly expert at it, because there’s nothing so boring as when you get slick.”

“I was very happy to get rid of two-parters when I did, and [in series 9 I was] very happy to bring them back,” he added, leaving us to wonder what he’ll change this year.

And now, Peter Capaldi has discussed his own wishes for his new co-lead. Specifically, he isn’t particularly keen on having a male companion.

“With the best will in the world, I don’t want a bloke,” he told Radio Times, “because I’m frightened that they’ll give him all the action and I’ll be standing around spouting scientific gobbledygook… ‘Oh, Peter’s not up to chasing those Zygons down the corridor, let the chap do it.’ And that would be awful. I want to chase the Zygons!”

“I just think that combo of the slightly strange and alien Time Lord with the intelligent, enthusiastic and inquisitive girl is a good combo. I don’t know why – but it just seems to work,” he added.

Whether Capaldi gets his wish or not, we’ll keep you up to date as we hear more on Doctor Who series 10, and the incoming new companion.

Additionally Doctor Who Magazine #496 is now on sale. I know I just got mine in the mail yesterday.

Doctor Who Magazine 496 (Credit: Panini)

Sir John Hurt is appearing at Gallifrey One in LA this weekend.

SQUEE!

 

The Long Dark Winter Begins

No more new WHO for probably 9 months. 😦

I have New Orleans on January 8-10. Matt Smith, Karen Gillan, and Jenna Coleman.

I have Gallifrey One to look forward to in February.

These things to keep me warm for a weekend.

Then it’s back to the long dark winter of no Doctor Who.

So at least in part I will be supplementing my blog with Comic Book reviews. I know they started over a year ago but until recently I hadn’t had the opportunity to read them.

I have not finished the backlog yet. Binge reading at work on my breaks takes time. But I am getting close.

And my over all impression isn’t very good, unfortunately.

Capaldi’s comics are the best so far. Not great, just the best.

David Tennant’s are up and down wildly.

And so far after 8 issues of Matt Smith, I’ve hated every single one of them!

Far to whimsical and too goofy. Just not the right voice for my Eleventh Doctor that I remember not so long ago.

The Four Doctors (which was just really 3 Doctors and a cameo appearance by the War Doctor) was frankly just confusing and I like Paul Cornell a great deal.

I hope it gets better, but right now, it sucks. I wonder why I’m buying them at the moment.

The Eighth Doctor series has only just started so I have only 2 issues and read the first one. It was pretty decent.

The Ninth Doctor Mini-Series is almost over, with him getting his own series in 2016, and it’s not bad at all.

So over all, a 5/10 for the line at the moment.

No exactly Steve Parkhouse  and Alan Ridgway that’s for sure. Or even Tony Lee, who had his issues but was still solid.

So here’s to 2016 and Series 10, the likely end of The Moffat Era and the likely end of the Capaldi Era. But that’s 363 days from now.

Review: Zygon Inversion – Maybe We Do Need a Doctor

inversion

You know they are coming…

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Ok, so now let’s talk about Bonnie & Clara.

Jenny Coleman was having way too much fun being evil this week.

Peter Capaldi was magnificent. A bravura performance. Worthy of any great stage performance.

Ingrid Oliver is amazing.

Best Line: Kate Stewart- “Five rounds rapid” reference after gunning down a Zygon, of course. 🙂

But my initial reaction to the episode, was being let down by a talk fest at the end. But it was magnificently written though.

But by the end of this blog, you’ll see a change… Not into a Zygon though. I want to let Zygons be Zygons (gotta ghet that in there just one more time!).

And the ties back to The Day of The Doctor are smack you in the face there for all to see.

But I’m just not convinced that Zygons that committed to being Zygons would give up that easily.

Or become an Osgood.

I just a cynical old soul I’m afraid. But maybe there’s hope…

But I will say this two-parter is one of the best in a long time, even if I might disagree with some of it’s politics.

Bear with me.  This is going to get messy but it does go somewhere in the end. 🙂

Politics is not new to Who. The Green Death hits you with a two-by-four and my favorite, The Sun Makers is not all that subtle. Just to name two. I love both of them.

And, of course, the grand daddy of them all, Genesis of The Daleks and the moral and ethical dilemmas inherent in a war that has lasted for longer than  anyone could really remember. It’s a classic of Doctor Who for all the right reasons and I think it is a great episode.

So it can’t be that.

“The only way people can live in peace is if they are prepared to forgive”.

Maybe I can’t forgive. People being beheaded and burned alive, “Convert or Die” kind of sticks with me.

But let’s move on.

Or was I expecting something else and my expectations were violated so that’s what annoys me?

Possibly.

War is futile, messy and ugly. No argument there. But it’s also been how the human race has been shaped, like it or not.

“a Dangerously savage child race”– The Q.

But maybe we’ll redeem ourselves. I probably won’t be around for that bit, sadly.

“The Zygon Inversion” makes an asset of all this by arguing war really can be reduced to a scale model, to a choice of two buttons for each combatant, one promising total victory, the other utter destruction.

But you don’t know which is which, so are you willing to gamble?

We know from Destiny of The Daleks that Davros would most certainly do so.

Now that was fascinating. 2 Boxes, 2 Identical buttons. But can I say, since these boxes were created years ago why did the Zygons latch onto the exact phrase INSIDE the boxes? And did the Doctor know something was up when Truth or Consequences was mentioned because that’s what he had in the boxes??

Clara knew what was in the boxes. So Bonnie/Zygella (not sure where that name came from)/Evil Clara should have known.

And the Zygon uprising in the town of that name.

Too meta referential?

But here’s a point by AV Club that is worth mentioning:

The Doctor Who universe has long allowed for the fact that, as the 2nd Doctor once so eloquently put it, “There are some corners of the universe that have bred the most terrible things, things that act against everything we believe in—they must be fought.” There are enemies out there like the Daleks and the Cybermen that cannot be reasoned or negotiated there, and the only option then is to fight back. What “The Zygon Inversion” suggests, however, is that the vast majority of wars are fought not between good and evil but rather between opposing groups too overwhelmed by petty hatred and fear to recognize what the Doctor points out, that war only delays the inevitable moment in which the two sides sit down and actually talk through their differences. Of course, by then, that fundamentally unnecessary war has likely already created all the trauma and anguish necessary to breed the next generation of warmakers.

And I am a child of The Cold War, after all. Those are my roots.

Stripping war of the delusional glory and sense of self-righteousness imparted by actual combat and reducing it all to the mere push of a button—more than that, refusing to grant war unearned solemnity by treating it as anything other than a sick, destructive game—allows the Doctor to get through to two scared, angry people who sincerely believe they have no alternative.

Republicans and Democrats?

Conservatives and Liberals?

Pro-Life Vs Pro Choice?

Pro-Illegal Alien vs Not  (aka “racists”)

The “War on Women”?

Are we so divisive that we can’t compromise because compromise is weakness?

Maybe so.

And that in of itself is sad.

Maybe we do need a Doctor. 🙂

Again, the arguments put forth in “The Zygon Inversion” are nakedly idealistic, but if the Doctor isn’t going to take a stand for the value of naked idealism, then who the hell is?

And I’m a let-down-constantly-wanna-be idealist who is a pessimist instead by life experience.

Idealism and hope and wonder is what I love about this show. It saved my life 30 years ago. I can never repay that.

I can never forget it either.

I can always hope, like the Doctor.

Peter Capaldi is brilliant in this episode and the final war dialogue is brilliant. The Doctor has earned his war wounds. He knows of what he speaks. The War Doctor’s pain is written all over his face.

He committed genocide once. Then he undid it, but the pain is still there.

Never Cruel. Never Cowardly.

War requires making hard choices, but the hardest choice of all can be deciding to fight for peace. That choice is difficult not because it requires terrible sacrifice or grim resolve, but rather because it requires a person to look deep within themselves and to put aside their own pettiness, to find the capacity to forgive and to let go of their grievances.

So maybe there is no warrior like a cold warrior. 🙂

(sorry I keep references Star Trek…) 🙂

So it is a brilliant episode overall. Much to think about.

That is not a bad thing.

Truth or Consequences indeed.

Way to go, Basil! 🙂

Free!

John Hurt (Credit: BBC)

Actor John Hurt has spoken of his delight on receiving the latest assessment of his fight with Pancreatic Cancer.

The actor, who played The War Doctor in the 50th Anniversary story Day of the Doctor, was diagnosed with the disease last Summer. However speaking at the Man Booker Prize ceremony on Tuesday night in London, he revealed he had recently been given good news by doctors.

I had a final scan and saw my oncologist and it’s all gone brilliantly. I am overjoyed, I am thrilled. It all looks great for the future, it’s fantastic.

His agent Charles Macdonald spoke to to BBC Radio Norfolk telling the station that Hurt had a very good meeting with his oncologist.

Sir John has been given very good news by his oncologist but it falls short of an all-clear. Nontheless it’s very good news.

The actor, who was knighted in the Queen’s New Year Honours list, said he was wary of using works like remission, even if true. Around 8,800 people are diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in the UK each year, making it the 11th most common cancer.

It was announced last week that Sir John will reprise his role as The War Doctor, in a new range of audio adventures for Big Finish Productions, the first of which will be released later this year.

Glad to hear it.

Putting the Hurt on Big Finish

John Hurt to return as The War Doctor in new Doctor Who audio plays

By Susanna Lazarus

John Hurt is reprising his role as The War Doctor in a series of 12 new Doctor Who audio plays. 

First introduced for Doctor Who’s 50th anniversary special, The Day of the Doctor, the War Doctor appeared alongside David Tennant and Matt Smith’s Doctors – a secret incarnation of the Time Lord who abandoned his name in order to fight The Time War against the Daleks. 

The 12 audio episodes will be released in four instalments, the first box set coming this December and titled Only The Monstrous. It is written and directed by Nicholas Briggs who said: “The story of the Doctor who refuses to call himself the Doctor in order to do the unthinkable upon the ultimate battlefield — all of space and time — was irresistible to me.

“Such a deeply disturbing and engaging character created by the formidable talents of writer Steven Moffat and actor John Hurt. It’s such a privilege to be working on this.”

The cast of The War Doctor will include Jacqueline Pearce (Blake 7, Doctor Who: Death Comes to Time) who will play Time Lord Cardinal Ollistra – an “arch manipulator who is waging the Time War against the Daleks”.

The War Doctor has not been seen in the television series since the 50th anniversary. However, Engines of War – a novel also set in the Time War written by George Mann– was released in 2014.

Big Finish seem to be doing their damndest to make fans’ wishes come true over the next two years. 2017 will see a prequel to Only the Monstrous starring the War Doctor’s predecessor, played by Paul McGann, during the early skirmishes of the conflict. He and River Song will also appear together for the first time early next year…and even Strax is getting his own turn in the audio spotlight this November.

Four Doctors #1

I just read it yesterday. Paul Cornell is a very good writer and quite the classic fan boy.

***SPOILERS***

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I mean who else would use Marinus, an obscure 1st Season Hartnell episode as the plot point in the story.

The bloody Voord!!

I wonder how many NuWho fanatics had to google them to find out what they hell was going on? 🙂

Then Clara tries to prevent them all meeting and ends up being the CAUSE OF them meeting. Loved it.

Companions from various Doctors rarely get to chinwag with each other. They sure as hell didn’t get much more than a sentence or two in “The Five Doctors”.

But, my one criticism was that I felt that the Matt Smith’s 11th Doctor was a bit off.I have been trying to think why that thought just kept popping up over and over again and I just lay my finger on it.

And also when they met Capaldi’s 12th I did wonder about in “Deep Breath” where the 11th on the phone to Clara from her past said, “Tell me I didn’t get old”.

(Paraphrase): “So we just caused a paradox at a fix point in time?”

My brain screamed “Reavers!” just as they appeared on the page.

Look forward to #2

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Courtesy of Titan Comics:

BBC Fan Q&A with Doctor Who: Four Doctors writer, Paul Cornell:

Question from Floris:

WHAT IS A MODERN DOCTOR WHO MONSTER THAT YOU WOULD

HAVE LOVED TO SEE MATCH UP WITH A CLASSIC DOCTOR?

Paul: I think the Second Doctor would have a lot of fun running rings

round the Judoon.

Question from Julie:

WHAT IS YOUR FAVOURITE DOCTOR WHO STORY ON AND OFF TV?

Paul: On TV, I think it’s ‘Kinda’, this week anyway.  Off TV, I’d go for

one of Kate Orman’s New Adventures novels, probably Sleepy.  

Question from Chris:

IF YOU COULD DO A COMIC FOR ANY OF THE CLASSIC DOCTORS,
WHICH ONE AND WHY?

Paul: I’d love to do a Third Doctor comic, with all the UNIT stuff

widescreen and huge.  That’s the one case where I don’t think the

limitations of the TV show of the time should be applied to the comic,

in order to keep the style right.  The TV Pertwee era tried for big use

of vehicles and extras, and we can just do that a bit better in comic form.

Question from Alice:

WE’VE HEARD A LOT ABOUT HOW THE DOCTORS ARE VERY SIMILAR

ON SCRIPT AND IT’S THE ACTOR’S PORTRAYAL THAT GIVES THE

BIGGEST DIFFERENCE IN DELINEATING THEIR DOCTOR. THIS IDEA HAS

BEEN REINFORCED BY HAVING VARIOUS ACTORS WHO HAVE

PORTRAYED THE DOCTOR READING MATT SMITH’S SCRIPTS. HOW DO

YOU GO ABOUT DIFFERENTIATING THE DOCTORS WHEN IT IS IN

COMIC BOOK FORMAT?

Paul: It’s the writer’s job in a book or comic to bring all the tics of the

character, to do the acting as well.  I’m not sure that ‘all the same

dialogue’ thing is true for all Doctors.  I can’t imagine Troughton saying Capaldi lines.

Question from David:

WHICH OF THE FOUR DOCTORS DO YOU ENJOY WRITING FOR MOST?

Paul: It’s a joy to surprise myself with what comes out of the Twelfth

Doctor’s mouth.  Such an infinite well of new material.

Question from Joel:

IF YOU WERE A COMPANION TO THOSE FOUR DOCTORS AT LEAST

ONCE EACH, WHERE/WHEN DO YOU THINK THEY WOULD TAKE YOU

TO OR WHAT SORT OF ADVENTURE COULD YOU SEE YOURSELF IN

WITH THAT DOCTOR?

Paul: Phew, err, I think I’d avoid the War Doctor, marry the… no, wait

a sec.  I wouldn’t want to travel with anyone fighting in the Time War,

so I’d like to go exploring history with the Eleventh.  I couldn’t keep up

with Ten.  I wouldn’t mind being part of one of Twelve’s teams of

mates for some sort of heist.  

Question from George:

WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO PEOPLE TRYING TO WRITE A

DOCTOR WHO STORY?

Paul: Sort out your ending first.  Use the shape of your plot to explore

some aspect of character for your leads.  Challenge the characters,

surprise them, hurt them.  

Question from Josh:

I JUST HAVE TO TELL YOU, I LOVED FATHER’S DAY SO MUCH AND

THE HUMAN NATURE 2 PARTER. QUESTION TIME – WHAT WAS YOUR

FAVORITE EPISODE FROM CLASSIC WHO AND WHY? IF I CAN SQUEEZE

A SECOND QUESTION IN, WHAT WHO BOOK AUTHOR DO YOU ENJOY

READING THE MOST?

Paul: Ah, well, it was ‘Kinda’ earlier, but now it’s become ‘The Mind

Robber’… no, ‘Horror of Fang Rock!’  And I love reading Kate Orman’s

books.  But I already said that, so, Jac Rayner!

Question from Pam:

DO YOU APPROACH WRITING DIFFERENTLY WHEN YOU ARE WRITING

FOR A COMIC VS ONE OF YOUR NOVELS OR SCREENPLAYS? I 

LOVE YOUR WORK!!!

Paul: Oh yes, and thanks, it’s a whole different set of rules.  You have

to get your head in order to write each different medium.  It takes

changing gears.  

Question from Jeffrey:

PAUL, WHAT IS THE ATOMIC WEIGHT OF THORIUM?

Paul: 232.03806 u ± 0.00002 u

Question from Jose:

WHICH OF YOUR VIRGIN NEW ADVENTURES WAS YOUR FAVORITE?

Paul: Love and War, I think.  

Question from Dylan:

HOW PROUD ARE YOU OF THAT “LAPELS THING” JOKE? BECAUSE YOU

SHOULD BE!

Paul: Thanks!  Very proud!  I’m very proud of the whole comic,

honestly.  I think it’s one of my best Doctor Who stories.

John Hurt

Sir John Hurt has revealed he has been diagnosed with early stage pancreatic cancer. In a statement released to the Press Association, he said:

I have always been open about the way in which I conduct my life and in that spirit I would like to make a statement.

I have recently been diagnosed with early stage pancreatic cancer. I am undergoing treatment and am more than optimistic about a satisfactory outcome, as indeed is the medical team.

I am continuing to focus on my professional commitments and will shortly be recording “Jeffrey Bernard is Unwell” (one of life’s small ironies!) for Radio 4

Alex Ford, CEO of Pancreatic Cancer UK, the only national charity fighting pancreatic cancer, said:

We were deeply saddened to learn of Sir John Hurt’s recent diagnosis of pancreatic cancer – but eternally grateful for his openness in talking about the disease and his treatment. This can only help raise much needed awareness of pancreatic cancer and the importance of early diagnosis. Importantly, John Hurt’s attitude and optimism will provide hope for many others affected by this disease. We wish him the best with his treatment.
John Hurt was awarded a Knighthood for his services to drama in the Queen’s New Year Honours list.

If you wish to make a donation to the charity, you can do so at pancreaticcancer.org.uk/donate.

In The US: http://www.npcf.us/donate/

Australia: http://www.pancreaticcancer.net.au/donate

My Best wishes as well.

Sir War Doctor

John Hurt, who played the War Doctor in the 50th Anniversary special The Day of the Doctor, has been awarded a knighthood in the Queen’s New Year Honours list.

The actor was given his award for services to drama. Sir John Hurt has had a career lasting more than five decades, appearing in films such as The Elephant Man, where he played John Merrick, Nineteen Eighty-Four where he played Winston Smith and Scandal where he played Stephen Ward. On Television he is best known for playing Caligula in the renowned I, Claudius and Quentin Crisp in The Naked Civil Servant. His distinctive voice has been used in many productions such as Watership Down and the animated The Lord of the Rings.

Also honoured is actor James Corden who played Craig Owens alongside the Eleventh Doctor, who has been made an Officer of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, or OBE. Corden, who was also honoured for services to drama said he was delighted at with award.

“I’m thrilled, overwhelmed and honoured to be recognised in such a way. I feel very lucky to be born in a country where creativity is both encouraged and valued. My family are very proud. My mum is already fretting about what to wear.”

Engines of War

Patrick Kavanagh-Sproull interviews the author of Engines of War.

day-hurt-timewar

 Available in the US Sept 9th.

Thank the heavens for Engines of War. And for George Mann, too, because without him, the new masterpiece from BBC Books would have never been made (because in less skilled hands it could have flopped massively but Mann tackled the commission deftly). The writer (Paradox Lost, Tales of Trenzalore: An Apple A Day) was tasked with delivering a full-length novel that preceded The Day of the Doctor, chronicling the later years of the War Doctor’s life,and he delivered a piece of extremely rich and satisfying prose.

This interview was late coming purely because the success of Engines of War overwhelmed Mann – and rightly so, he deserves every ounce of praise. If you currently don’t have a copy of it then I implore you to acquire one as soon as possible – it’s a real accomplishment.

I had the chance to fire a few questions at Mann about researching the Time War, nailing John Hurt’s mannerisms and the possibility of returning.

Its a considerable remit to be given to be the person to write an adventure set during the Time War so what was it like when you first sat down to write Engines of War?

Exciting, daunting, a little terrifying. To be honest, I found I couldn’t really dwell on what I was doing – writing the first solo adventure of the War Doctor, fighting the Daleks during the Time War, which has to be every fan’s dream gig – because otherwise I started overthinking it. It helped that I was working on a deadline, which meant that I couldn’t afford to stall. I just had to roll my sleeves up and get stuck in.

That said, every now and then, lying in bed at night, there was a certain little frisson when I considered how lucky I was. In fact, there still is!

Probably a dull question here but when I found out there was a War Doctor novel coming out, I was genuinely surprised. Its quite a quick turnaround after The Day of the Doctor so when were you approached (and if you factor in your excellent instalment in the Tales of Trenzalore anthology, you were clearly quite a busy bee for the first half of this year)? And what was your reaction to being asked?

It was after the Tales of Trenzalore story that Justin approached me about writing the book, so yes, I was a VERY busy man for a while. But no matter how busy you are, how little sleep it will mean, you don’t turn down an opportunity like that. So I made it work. And I didn’t sleep, I can assure you. Especially that first night.

My reaction to being asked? I think I swore a lot. As in, Malcolm Tucker amounts of swearing. Then I actually got up and did a silly little dance behind my desk, caught my breath, and rushed off to tell my ten year-old son (who then had to be sworn to absolute secrecy!).

Did you ever consider including a character that has already appeared in the show and using them as the companion (i.e. Romana, Susan)?

I considered it, of course. But I think there was a risk I could have overdone it. I mean, we’re all hoping this isn’t going to be the only Time War story, aren’t we? And those characters like Leela, Romana etc, they deserve breathing space, proper stories of their own. This book was always going to be the War Doctor’s story. It had to be – it’s the first one. And then there were the Daleks and the Time Lords to consider. I think revisiting old companions would have done two things – thrown away their stories as footnotes, and overloaded the book with continuity. I’m very fond of those characters and I’d love to write for them all one day, but I wanted to get the balance right.

How did the character of Cinder come about, then?

Well, the Doctor isn’t the Doctor without a companion, and as I said a moment ago, this was always going to be the War Doctor’s book. He needed a counterpoint, someone to contrast him against, and someone to see him through fresh eyes and share that experience with the reader.

I’m very fond of Cinder. She really became a person to me while I was writing the book. She starts the story in a very similar place to the Doctor – alone, drifting, fighting, unfocused – and it’s seeing this that allows the Doctor to see himself properly for the first time in years, to see what he’s become. Cinder reminds him who he is, and that’s exactly what he needs, even if he doesn’t like it.

Theres an awful lot of history with the Time War so how much research did you do beforehand?

I watched and re-watched a lot of episodes of the show. Last of the Time Lords, The Five Doctors, The Deadly Assassin, The Parting of the Ways, The Stolen Earth – and, of course, The Day of the Doctor. As well as lots of others. I looked up what had been written about the Time War, too, in terms of reference books and articles. I wanted to make sure I didn’t contradict anything – unless I wanted to!

Having written for the Eleventh Doctor before, was there a considerable difference in writing for the War Doctor?

Absolutely, yes. He’s very much the same Doctor, of course, but he has his own mannerisms and speech patterns, and he’s at a very different point in his life. There’s a burden on his shoulders, the weight all the things he’s has to do. A bitterness, too, because he’s had to sacrifice himself in the process, and it still hasn’t changed anything. He’s made a difference, of course, but he hasn’t been able to stop the war, and now he’s getting exasperated.

Just as I did when I was writing for Matt Smith’s Eleventh Doctor, I watched John Hurt’s performance over and over, until his voice was in my head, and I could hear him saying the lines in the book. I think with a character like this it’s really important that you try your best to capture the actor’s performance on the page, to make the character feel authentic.

I found that, in Engines of War, you have a very specific window to slot the entire novel into. Youve got a smattering of familiar faces appearing in the book and you could compare it to a game of Operation in that you have to be very careful not to touch the sides i.e. affect these familiar facescharacter arcs. Did you have to be very deliberate when writing?

[Note: The following answer contains a spoiler about a returning character. If you haven’t read the story it is recommended you skip ahead]

Oh, absolutely. Again, I wanted to be very true to the characters, but at the same time I wanted to tell a meaningful story. I didn’t want to put everything back in the toy box at the end. It has to mean something, otherwise it’s not worth telling the story in the first place. What happens to Borusa, for example – it’s a story of redemption, and it changes our perspective of him irrevocably.

One of the most satisfying things about the whole experience has been the amount of people who’ve told me they read the book and then went back to watch The Day of the Doctor, and that the experience of reading the book had enriched the viewing experience for them, because they now have a deeper understanding of why the War Doctor is making the decisions he is, and the emotional journey he’s coming to that episode off the back of.

I think that after most people have put down Engines of War, theyll be screaming for the rooftops for more Doctor Who material from you. So, what are your hopes regarding your future on Doctor Who?

Well, I’d love to write more. I’m bursting with enthusiasm for Doctor Who. It’s a part of my psyche, and has been since I was a kid. I’ll always make time for it, and if Engines of War proves popular, I’d love to follow it up with another book. Of course, if Mr. Moffat is reading, he only has to ask…I’d give my eye-teeth to write an episode of the show!

George Mann, thank you very much.

The Doctor Goes to War

Early details have been revealed on a new Doctor Who hardback novel entitled “Engines of doctor-who-engines-of-warWar“, written by George Mann.

The story will fill in some of the blanks of John Hurt’s incarnation and events in the Time War leading up to The Day of the Doctor.

Mann teases what fans can expect in the new DWM: “A new companion! Calculating Time Lords! New Dalek paradigms! It’s a war story, at its heart, set against the backdrop of great turmoil and chaos.

“But it’s also about the Doctor’s personal journey, how he ends up where he is at the beginning of The Day of the Doctor. He’s been through the wringer; and in Engines of War, he’s not given any reprieve.”

The hardcover release is is released 31 July 2014

 

 

 

matt-smith-nightmare

Deadline report that Matt Smith has been cast in a major role in the new Terminator trilogy.

Smith is reportedly set to first appear in Terminator Genesis in 2015 and his role will grow over the second and third films.